Fatal Houston paraglider crash in Fulshear in Fort Bend County has resulted in two deaths on Tuesday. The Federal Aviation Administration reported a Cessna 208, a single-engine plane that was flying from George Bush Intercontinental Airport to Victoria Regional Airport was involved in the crash as it struck a paraglider in its way around 9:40 a.m. on Tuesday. Each of the individuals on the aircraft, the Cessna and the paragliding aircraft were killed after the crash and collapse.

The Texas Department of Public Safety reported the news via a Twitter update first saying, “@TxDPSSoutheast is responding to a fatal plane crash in Fort Bend County. The crash occurred near Fulshear. The FAA has been notified and is responding to the scene.”

Texas Department of Public Safety
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Witness Wyatt Scott has been reported to give a statement regarding the Houston paraglider crash, saying, “It was a yellow and white plane. It looked like a stunt plane, and it came down real hard. When it came down, it looked like it was in one piece, and I got a good glimpse right before it hit the ground.”

He added, “I honestly should have died because I was 20 feet away. If I’d left the house any later, I would have been dead.” Three different scenes and locations were reported to be involved with the Houston paraglider crash incident, including Bowser Road, southwest of Fulshear, where debris from the crash was found, area near  Highway 36 near Orchard where parachute from the paraglider was found and Weston Lakes community on Waterloo Court, where officials found the body of one of the victims.

Investigations are underway, and so far there are no confirmations regarding what led to the Houston paraglider crash, and who’s fault it was if anyone. Fort Bend County Medical Examiner’s Office has not released the names or identities of the two individuals that died in the crash, further developments and confirmations from the investigation might help find out who the two individuals were. The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration both are overseeing the investigation.