The world is still swarming with coronavirus affecting and claiming millions of lives. In that scenario, new studies are being conducted every day to prevent pandemic and save lives.

Very recent research that was conducted by a team of scientists and published their study in the journal “Physics of Fluids”, discovered that flushing down the lavatory can create a haze of water condensations that ascent almost three feet. These drops can land on the surface and contaminate the space or can be breathed in by the next user.

The study found out that the cloud of droplets can carry the particles of viruses that were either discarded by the previous visitor or were already floating in the air. For now, the researchers are not certain that the public toilets are the major cause of spreading viruses.

The coronavirus which has killed almost 5 million people around the world with 8 million still infected has led the scientists to look at things differently. The examination highlights how certain basic spaces may be reconsidered.

Flushing the toilet may push coronavirus aerosols 3 feet into air

The vaporizers created by toilets are something that we’ve thought about for some time, yet numerous individuals have underestimated. Yet people now need to be cautious and careful towards the most common things and spaces to stay safe.

Scientists, during a controlled study of fluids dynamics, found out the alarming results. They explored to envision the progression of liquid during flushing and how it impacts the likely spread of infectious particles.

As it turned out there massive quantity of fluids that travel upwards once the toilet is flushed which can contain infected particles. 40-60% infected particles land on the surface which would lead to the spread of viruses on a very large scale given the fact that almost everyone uses a shaded toilet.

Many countries have been opening up with no-strict rules which would make it hard to practice social distancing within little restrooms. Keeping those confined spaces extremely sanitized all the time, where the virus can live up to 14 days, will be difficult.

The best practice in that situation is to keep the facemask on even in the washrooms and avoid touching your face. Everyone who uses a shared toilet or use public lavatory should wash their hands thoroughly and repeatedly to avoid any hazards residing in the toilet space. Also, ensure that you close the commode lid before you flush and avoid using public toilets.